Can I get into med school with an MA in Economics?

Can I get into med school with an MA in Economics? Topic: Can I get into med school with an MA in Economics?
July 16, 2019 / By Aldine
Question: Can I get into med school with an MA in Economics? I started undergrad in engineering, then switched to economics. I'm getting ready to finish a masters program in economics, and I'm weighing my options after that. Would I have a realistic shot at getting into med school, given that background? I'm aware of the process (MCAT scores, biology/chemistry/physiology prereqs), and I know money is a huge factor, too. I don't have a strong background in any of the biological sciences, and my grades have fluctuated with my employment (I'm a starving student who has to work for a living) so my transcripts are less than stellar. Is becoming a surgeon just a pipe dream, or could it be attainable (if I got the MCAT scores and found a sugar mamma, of course)?
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Best Answers: Can I get into med school with an MA in Economics?

Symphony Symphony | 3 days ago
If your MA grades are good, then that might help take some focus off of your undergrad career, but you'll probably be shut out of top tier med schools without even getting consideration. This, of course, depends on how well you do on the MCAT. Do well enough on the MCAT, and you'll definitely get interviews *somewhere*. Studying economics will not hurt you--it'll help you, if anything. It's a little unfair that a couple of bad grades earned while you're still a teenager end up affecting your life a decade down the road, but unfortunately, that's life. Lots of people have to deal with that. I'm pretty sure most people pay for med school with a couple hundred thousand dollars in loans, so don't worry about the money (unless you somehow fail out, in which case you're screwed, but that's true for everyone).
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Symphony Originally Answered: London School of Economics and the Universities of Edinburgh, Manchester, Southampton and Glascow?
I'm a American getting a masters at LSE. Don't know about applying for undergrad, but the school takes a lot of year abroad students and hordes of US masters students. On the plus side the school doesn't require you to take the GRE for most grad programs, and may not require any standardized tests for undergrad either. A few general thoughts: London is EXTREMELY expensive. The school also doesn't have an ordinary campus-- it's just a couple of buildings in the middle of London. It has dorms but they're spread out all over London. In other words if you want to have the typical college experience, this may not be the best place to go. Also in British undergrad degree programs you study one subject and only one subject. If you don't know what you want to major in yet, do your undergrad in the states and then apply for a masters.

Rebekah Rebekah
The acceptance rate at some of the better known med schools is about 1%. OK, so some of the lesser known schools have a much higher admit rate, but don't count your chickens before they hatch. You are going to be competing for a seat against kids who have been planning on entering med school since they were in Junior High. It doesn't matter that you majored in Econ. The med schools dont care about that. What they care is that you got A in organic chem, physics with calc, etc and then aced the MCATs. Majors don't count. Grades in key courses count. Also, it would be a great idea to have several hundred hours of volunteering in health care settings so they can be certain that you are totally dedicated to medicine as a profession, and having your name on a published research article or two wouldnt be bad either. You did that when you were a Freshman or Sophomore, right? You can apply to med school with a reasonable chance of getting admitted when you have checked off the same items on the list as the other kids.... When will that be?
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Meryle Meryle
one million. As intense as possible is sturdy. unquestionably it relies upon on the college and their standards besides as people who're additionally utilising alongside with you. for many faculties probable a three.5 or extra valuable will artwork. 2. relies upon at this technique and the college. Is it a terminal masters application? Then probable approximately 2 years. Is it a Ph.D. application in the time of which you get carry of a masters? Then approximately 4-6 looking on what your doing. 3. back, relies upon on the college and this technique. some won't have a topic with area-time grads and a few could desire to. examine with the faculties and classes your drawn to. 4. Yep. GRE for many. another classes have their own attempt like medical college demands taking the MCAT. 5. as quickly as back, relies upon on the college, application and the dep.. Get as lots information as you are able to with regards to the standards of the faculties, departments and classes for the place you're able to pick to attend. If possible, talk with some pupil who're at the instant in those classes - they are able to supply you a large number of information.
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Lettie Lettie
Yeah you can. i've got a friend who read maths and philosophy for her first degree who is starting a grad entry medicine course. It's a very intense degree but if you're interested check out http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/shared/share...
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Lettie Originally Answered: some economics homework i need help with.?
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