do i have a concussion?

do i have a concussion? Topic: do i have a concussion?
June 27, 2019 / By Annelisa
Question: Today me and my friends were recording a video.. and i was suppose to throw myself against a wall... and i did but hit my head off the wall really hard! i was fine but now my head hurts the back of it and the front my eyes kinda hurt too concussion? or wht?
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Best Answers: do i have a concussion?

Wyatt Wyatt | 5 days ago
so far the last three answers have been all wrong. Concussions are graded by three levels. 1- no passing out but brain function affected 2- passed out but less than 5 min 3- passed out for more than 5 min the higher the number the more serious the condition. If you are able to recall all of the normal things from memory that you usually do (phone numbers, movie lines, answers to homework questions) and you did not lose conciousness then you probably just have a headache. If you are throwing up or are forgetting things that you normally wouldn't you should probably have it checked out by a doctor to make sure you don't have a slow bleed in your brain (subdural hematoma or subarachnoid hemorage). By the way you cannot have brain cells die and then new ones grow back. Once a brain cell is dead it's gone forever and your body doesn't make new ones. The ones that are left over just grow larger and branch out with what are called dendrites. Lastly don't be a moron and hit your head into a wall deliberately, unless all you want out of life is to be a ditch digger.
👍 198 | 👎 5
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Wyatt Originally Answered: What is the 1st thing an ER Dr. does to determine a concussion or serious head injury?
When someone with a potential concussion sees a doctor, the doctor will ask for information about how the head injury occurred and ask very basic questions such as, "What year is it?" This is to make sure the patient is thinking clearly. The neurological exam will also screen for problems with reflexes, vision/hearing, memory loss, and coordination. X-rays will usually be taken, and in some situations a CT scan or MRI is warranted to make sure there is not excessive internal bleeding. If the patient is unresponsive, as you mention above, the neurological exam will quickly proceed, and then CT or MRI studies will be performed. In most cases, the patient will be sent home the same day with instructions for how someone should monitor them. This may include waking the person with the head injury every few hours through the night just to be sure that they are able to regain normal consciousness, and watching for the initial symptoms mentioned above. Other times, an overnight stay in the hospital is necessary to be observed by medical personnel. Only in severe cases are more drastic measures needed. There are five different grades into which a concussion can be classified, depend on its severity. A grade I concussion is the least serious and displays only minor symptoms, such as brief confusion. Many people have had a grade I concussion without realizing it. Someone with a grade II concussion typically has symptoms that last longer than fifteen minutes, brief memory loss, and confusion. The more severe grades display some or all of the more minor symptoms, as well loss of consciousness that lasts less than five for grade III, between five and ten minutes for grade IV, and more than ten minutes for grade V. The classification system is important because it determines how quickly the patient can resume normal activities. There are also special restrictions for people who suffer multiple concussions within a given period of time, depending on the grade of each concussion. Injuries on the front of the brain are usually less problematic than those to the back, left side, or right side of the brain. Someone who has been diagnosed with a concussion, especially of a more severe grade, should be monitored to see how long the symptoms last. Postconcussion syndrome is when the initial signs of memory loss, confusion, et cetera, are still present a couple of months after the injury. A doctor should be aware of lingering symptoms so that proper action can be taken. Some patients will require rehabilitation therapy.

Shaw Shaw
It sounds like you certainly did some damage to your brain. The back of your head is where your occipital lobes are. They are the part of the brain that works your vision. Whether it gets better soon or not I would have no idea. That is where the doctors come into play. I agree with the the previous poster that the first 3 posters were all wrong. But from personal experience with a mild traumatic brain injury (level1) I can tell you that you can have long lasting effects. Most people don't, but I did. I deal with it every day, 5 years after the fact. The reason is that I had swelling (no bleeding) on the brain. And it killed some brain cells. And as the above poster said, you don't grow new ones. Sometimes other parts of the brain learn how to do what the dead brain cells did. However, sometimes they don't! So please go to the doctor to make sure you don't have any bleeding on the brain. Then look out for unusual symptoms. If you get them, you will know it! Good Luck to you - and the best advice - protect your brain!!!
👍 80 | 👎 -2

Niel Niel
a concussion is when to many brain cells die and your brain turns off until there's more brain cells. So you don't have a concussion you probably just hurt your head if threes a bump put some ice On it and get some sleep you'll be fine
👍 76 | 👎 -9

Kole Kole
no if it was a concussion i thought you would be like, passed out or whatever? your head is probably just sore from the contact and your eyes,... maybe something with your brain rattling from the contact of the wall?? idk
👍 72 | 👎 -16

Kole Originally Answered: What is the 1st thing an ER Dr. does to determine a concussion or serious head injury?
When someone with a potential concussion sees a doctor, the doctor will ask for information about how the head injury occurred and ask very basic questions such as, "What year is it?" This is to make sure the patient is thinking clearly. The neurological exam will also screen for problems with reflexes, vision/hearing, memory loss, and coordination. X-rays will usually be taken, and in some situations a CT scan or MRI is warranted to make sure there is not excessive internal bleeding. If the patient is unresponsive, as you mention above, the neurological exam will quickly proceed, and then CT or MRI studies will be performed. In most cases, the patient will be sent home the same day with instructions for how someone should monitor them. This may include waking the person with the head injury every few hours through the night just to be sure that they are able to regain normal consciousness, and watching for the initial symptoms mentioned above. Other times, an overnight stay in the hospital is necessary to be observed by medical personnel. Only in severe cases are more drastic measures needed. There are five different grades into which a concussion can be classified, depend on its severity. A grade I concussion is the least serious and displays only minor symptoms, such as brief confusion. Many people have had a grade I concussion without realizing it. Someone with a grade II concussion typically has symptoms that last longer than fifteen minutes, brief memory loss, and confusion. The more severe grades display some or all of the more minor symptoms, as well loss of consciousness that lasts less than five for grade III, between five and ten minutes for grade IV, and more than ten minutes for grade V. The classification system is important because it determines how quickly the patient can resume normal activities. There are also special restrictions for people who suffer multiple concussions within a given period of time, depending on the grade of each concussion. Injuries on the front of the brain are usually less problematic than those to the back, left side, or right side of the brain. Someone who has been diagnosed with a concussion, especially of a more severe grade, should be monitored to see how long the symptoms last. Postconcussion syndrome is when the initial signs of memory loss, confusion, et cetera, are still present a couple of months after the injury. A doctor should be aware of lingering symptoms so that proper action can be taken. Some patients will require rehabilitation therapy.
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