Pet sitting job?

Pet sitting job? Topic: Pet sitting job?
June 24, 2019 / By Aggy
Question: I'm planning on starting a pet sitting business during the summer along with this other girl and I'm wondering would you trust or dog or cat with two 13 year olds for a few days (like just to feed play clean their poop and walk them) once a day. And if so how much would you pay them? p.s. I have a 4 pet cats and my friend has 2 cats and a dog
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Best Answers: Pet sitting job?

Tikva Tikva | 3 days ago
I'd pay about $16/day, assuming that you spent about an hour playing with him, walking him, cleaning up poop and all that. So you'd each get about $8. You have to be very business-like, which means being on time, walking the dog at the right time even if your favorite show is on, and being respectful of your clients.
👍 274 | 👎 3
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Tikva Originally Answered: how much shoould i charge for dog sitting?
I am in England, and if you were over here I would be able to give you a pretty good idea, but would advise you to do a bit of homework first anyway. I hope some of these pointers can be validly applied over there? Different areas will charge differently anyway. Try to find out what other people are charging; Maybe ask at the vets? The pet local shop might know, or know someone who does it. Slightly devious, but you wouldn't be the only one to phone a local dog sitter to enquire how much they might charge to do the same for you, "Just in case you decide to go away later in the year." If all the above fails, do you know how much kennelling costs locally? Phone and ask. Think about the cost of them kennelling them, then remember the owners clearly don't want to kennel, so you're providing an elite service which suits them better. You are living in, which may be a bit of an inconvenience for you. This means their home is more secure too. Have they indicated any other jobs they might expect you to do (over and above leaving it as you found it)? Be very clear what they expect from you. Friend of mine did a job. Went in advance to meet & greet, when they went through everything. Was doing a number of animals and some cleaning, but free to leave the house for a few hours a day if she wished. When she arrived to actually take over and see them off they spent two hours explaining all about how she needed to water his garden of considerable size (Taking roughly an hour a day), feeding extra animals, they were going to be back a day later than they thought, and I can't remember what else was suddenly included. I know she felt cheated as she had charged a fair price based on what she thought she was being asked to do. I know a lot may be different over there, but some of it might help? It's a hard one; as so many factors are individual and each house-sit needs to be considered on its own merits. If you get as much local info as you can, find out exactly what you have to do and what's thrown in (food poss??), then think about how hard you'll be working and how much you would LIKE to be paid for it. Then offset that against what other info you've picked up. It's hard to get it right for so many reasons, but you need to get yourself to a point where you have a figure you're happy with. It's hard to get the balance between outprcing yourself and underselling your talents. Give them a price, be prepared to flex a little if they feel it's a bit steep. If you really want the job consider lowering a little, but have a pre-decided bottom price to begin with. Hope some of this helps?? Good Luck, Dawn x

Raleigh Raleigh
I would but only if I already knew them fairly well. Most 13 y.o. young folks are not as responsible as you sound, nor can they be counted on to put the care of someone else's dog/cat above their own sudden desires. For instance, although they should be walking the dog, a friend drops by and they both go out to the movies instead--or they get into a video game and forget the rest of the world. If I were you, I'd start by asking all your teachers, adult friends, adult relatives, local acquaintances (but make sure you now these people so you aren't getting into a bad situation unknowingly) if they need someone to pet sit or even just do daily dog walks, etc. I know that some of the people at work need someone to walk their dog daily because no one is home for 12+ hours a day. My niece does dog walking in Boston and she charges $25 per dog per week. You should also write up a contract stating exactly what services you will be providing for that person, how often, what happens if something unavoidable comes up and you can't do it, what happens if the payer cancels suddenly, etc. It's probably better for you if you charged by the week (5 days of dog care whether they use all 5 days or not) otherwise you'll need to be paid every day to make sure you get what you are owed. Like, what if you go to the house one day and the payer is home 'cause he's taken a day off of work so he will be walking his own dog that day--do you charge him even though you didn't walk the dog? Would you not charge if he gave you at least 24hours warning? What if the dog got suddenly sick or injured--what would you do? What will you do if someone doesn't pay or can't pay what they owe you? What happens if some horrible accident happens while the animal is under your care--you (or your parents) can be sued so you might want to consult your parents. I would highly suggest you NOT take a job from anyone you (and your family) do not already know and trust--too many sickos out there. You might want to also ask if your local vet(s) will hire you to walk the dogs in their care (if you could land that job, it would be a super good future work reference).
👍 120 | 👎 -4

Marlon Marlon
I had my own pet sitting business. I'd have to say it depends on the 13 year old. I've seen some incredibly mature and responsible 13 year olds, and others who behaved like 7 year olds. Remember, you will be having a huge responsiblity being trusted with someone else's house and belongings. You must be sure to lock up. You don't discuss your clients or who you are pet sitting for with ANYONE--they could be tempted to break in and rob the place. I'd have a parent sit in the car and watch out for me if I were your age. You must have good animal handling skills so you don't get hurt or hurt the animal. What if the pet gets sick or injured? You will be responsible for taking it to the vet and perhaps paying for emergency treatment. Can you do this or are your parents willing to help you do this? Are you responsible enough to show up for every visit? Look for signs of illness in the pet? Just some things for you to think about. Also the owner may have to pay through their insurance if you get hurt on their property, as you probably won't have your own liability insurance. Most professional pet sitters are licensed, bonded (against theft) and insured. As a pet sitter, I charge anywhere from $5.00 to $15.00 a visit, depending on how far I drove, how long I was expected to stay, and how many animals I had to take care of. Oh, and don't forget, even if you get sick you still have to show up and take care of the pet! Just some things to think about and talk over with your parents. Good luck
👍 118 | 👎 -11

Jerred Jerred
Pet sitting is a big responsibility. Other than caring for your own animals, have you and your friend received any formal training? Do you have references? You sometimes have to go into people's homes when they are away. Do you have liability insurance? Here are some websites you may want to check out. http://www.petsitllc.com/ http://www.petsits.com/ http://www.petsitters.org/ http://www.petsit.com/ You might want to check if there is already a pet-sitting business in your area, and see if you could find employment with them, as they would probably have the liability insurance, and you wouldn't have to pay for it. Best of luck!
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Giles Giles
Sure, plenty of people trusted me at that age...I did not start a business, however people would only let me watch their dogs. Have fun with it!
👍 114 | 👎 -25

Giles Originally Answered: how much shoould i charge for dog sitting?
I am in England, and if you were over here I would be able to give you a pretty good idea, but would advise you to do a bit of homework first anyway. I hope some of these pointers can be validly applied over there? Different areas will charge differently anyway. Try to find out what other people are charging; Maybe ask at the vets? The pet local shop might know, or know someone who does it. Slightly devious, but you wouldn't be the only one to phone a local dog sitter to enquire how much they might charge to do the same for you, "Just in case you decide to go away later in the year." If all the above fails, do you know how much kennelling costs locally? Phone and ask. Think about the cost of them kennelling them, then remember the owners clearly don't want to kennel, so you're providing an elite service which suits them better. You are living in, which may be a bit of an inconvenience for you. This means their home is more secure too. Have they indicated any other jobs they might expect you to do (over and above leaving it as you found it)? Be very clear what they expect from you. Friend of mine did a job. Went in advance to meet & greet, when they went through everything. Was doing a number of animals and some cleaning, but free to leave the house for a few hours a day if she wished. When she arrived to actually take over and see them off they spent two hours explaining all about how she needed to water his garden of considerable size (Taking roughly an hour a day), feeding extra animals, they were going to be back a day later than they thought, and I can't remember what else was suddenly included. I know she felt cheated as she had charged a fair price based on what she thought she was being asked to do. I know a lot may be different over there, but some of it might help? It's a hard one; as so many factors are individual and each house-sit needs to be considered on its own merits. If you get as much local info as you can, find out exactly what you have to do and what's thrown in (food poss??), then think about how hard you'll be working and how much you would LIKE to be paid for it. Then offset that against what other info you've picked up. It's hard to get it right for so many reasons, but you need to get yourself to a point where you have a figure you're happy with. It's hard to get the balance between outprcing yourself and underselling your talents. Give them a price, be prepared to flex a little if they feel it's a bit steep. If you really want the job consider lowering a little, but have a pre-decided bottom price to begin with. Hope some of this helps?? Good Luck, Dawn x
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